A Simple Plan For Investigating Printers

Why Now is the Time to Switch to 3D Design

It may appear to be a daunting task to transition from 2D design to 3D CAD software, particularly for small- or medium-sized enterprises that have overwhelmed IT resources, shoestring budgets, and understaffed design departments. For smaller organizations, copying with the productivity downtime associated with an even smaller size of engineering team during important design projects may be difficult to justify. The upfront cost of installing 3D design tools may also be difficult to justify, but extrapolating into the long run, these may make smaller companies more agile and competitive, competing on the same terms as their bigger counterparts, who definitely have deployed the state-of-the-art technology.

Below are certain myths you’ll encounter about deploying 3D printing software:

3D CAD Won’t Adversely Affect Your Uptime
The Beginner’s Guide to Options

Companies with small design crews are afraid that 3D CAD may cause significant downtime. Yet, there are strategies to mitigate the impact on uptime, for example moving tasks to 3D in phases, as you keep using 2D and forestall abrupt interference to work processes during the switch.
What Has Changed Recently With Printing?

Likewise, you could consider commissioning a 3D pilot project, in which case you assess all the pertinent tools and processes to detect and correct issues prior to deploying the system for the whole company. You’d expect any such a 3D pilot project to deploy an engineering application that’s autonomous to avoid interfering with the progress of other projects.

Your Products are Too Simple for 3D Design

Three-dimensional design adds value at all product creation phases, making the tool ideal for some of the simplest designs ever. Thanks to virtual assessments leveraging simulation applications, optimizing the design of simple elements of a larger product. Similarly, long-term customer demands may dictate changes or customization of certain product models, designs that can also be rapidly created using 3D CAD. You’ll also appreciate the advantage of convenient adoption of modifications to components that were originally made in 2D design, speeding up part development.

Your Legacy 2D Data Remains Usable

If you’re sitting on a “gold-mine” of legacy 2D data epitomizing years of hard work to collect it, it is easy to understand why you can’t lose at any cost. The great thing is that your data is not necessarily obsolete, since 2D concepts may be leveraged to generate perfect 3D designs. You can do that using conversion resources that let you import 2D designs into 3D CAD systems for any adjustments or printing.

CAD software for 3D printing is certainly the way to go today. Switching to 3D CAD won’t necessarily impact your uptime substantially, and it’s perfect even for your simplest or most intricate of product designs.